History of Diplomatic Relations: 1824 – 1851

Summary

Nicaragua and the United States first established diplomatic relations in 1824 while Nicaragua was joined with Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, and El Salvador within the Federation of Central American States. The United States recognized independent Nicaragua in 1849.

United States Recognition of the Federation of Central American States, 1824.

Following its independence from Spain and the Mexican Empire, Nicaragua joined the Federation of Central American States in 1823 along with Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, and El Salvador. The United States recognized the Federation when President James Monroe received Antonio José Cañaz as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary on August 4, 1824.

United States Recognition of Nicaragua, 1849.

Nicaragua withdrew from the Federation of Central American States on November 5, 1838. The United States recognized independent Nicaragua on December 24, 1849 when President James K. Polk received Nicaraguan Chargé d’Affaires, Eduardo Carcache.

Diplomatic Relations

Establishment of Diplomatic Relations with the Federation of Central American States, 1824.

The United States established diplomatic relations with the Federation of Central American States when President James Monroe received Antonio José Cañaz as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary on August 4, 1824.

Establishment of Diplomatic Relations with Nicaragua, 1849.

Nicaragua withdrew from the Federation of Central American States on November 5, 1838. Diplomatic relations were established between Nicaragua and the United States on December 24, 1849, when President James K. Polk received Nicaraguan Chargé d’Affaires, Eduardo Carcache.

Establishment of U.S. Diplomatic Mission, 1851.

The First U.S. diplomatic mission in Nicaragua was established on February 18, 1851, when Chargé d’Affaires John B. Kerr presented his credentials.